Sculptures and installations

Victor Vasarely, Interior design for dining room, 1972, Plastic and metal
Victor Vasarely, Interior design for dining room, 1972, Plastic and metal

The Bundesbank’s offices house a large number of sculptures and installations by acclaimed artists such as Tony Cragg, Bogomir Ecker, Alf Lechner and Joseph Kosuth. Most of those works were created or purchased to occupy a particular space in new buildings that were being constructed at that time, as "Kunst am Bau" [public art] projects. The installations respond in totally different ways to their respective settings. In Düsseldorf, Tony Cragg integrates four different sculptures into the building which thematise the geographical and industrial surroundings; in Oldenburg, meanwhile, Bogomir Ecker creates a link between the real urban space and the building’s interior.

Max Bill, Plane borne of a spiral, 1974

Max Bill, Plane borne of a spiral, 1974, gold-plated brass, 77 x 50 x 62 cm
Max Bill, Plane borne of a spiral, 1974, gold-plated brass, 77 x 50 x 62 cm

His pictures and sculptures are the perfect symbiosis of beauty and rationality. Just about every work that Max Bill produced can be deciphered as a verifiable solution to a mathematical problem, without becoming overladen with meaning. Sculptures like the one depicted, which have no beginning or end since they ingeniously twist space into a surface, were the defining speciality of arguably the most versatile protagonist of the Concrete art movement, which set out to create an art constructed on precise mathematical geometry. Bill attained additional fame as an industrial designer, conjuring up products like the Junghans kitchen clock with timer in 1951 or the "Ulmer Hocker", a multipurpose rectangular wooden stool/table/shelf/desk/lectern in 1954. He once remarked, ‘My aim is to create a shape or an expression that is as impersonal as possible’, meaning that the results of his labours should be ‘as objective as possible’.