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Sculptures and installations

Sculptures and installations

Victor Vasarely, Interior design for dining room, 1972, Plastic and metal
Victor Vasarely, Interior design for dining room, 1972, Plastic and metal

The Bundesbank’s offices house a large number of sculptures and installations by acclaimed artists such as Tony Cragg, Bogomir Ecker, Alf Lechner and Joseph Kosuth. Most of those works were created or purchased to occupy a particular space in new buildings that were being constructed at that time, as "Kunst am Bau" [public art] projects. The installations respond in totally different ways to their respective settings. In Düsseldorf, Tony Cragg integrates four different sculptures into the building which thematise the geographical and industrial surroundings; in Oldenburg, meanwhile, Bogomir Ecker creates a link between the real urban space and the building’s interior.

Tony Cragg, Boulders, 1992

Tony Cragg, Boulders, 1992, granite, 4 parts, Height 50-200 cm
Tony Cragg, Boulders, 1992, granite, 4 parts, Height 50-200 cm

The relationship between nature and culture plays a key role in Tony Cragg’s work. He wants to create objects ‘that exist neither in nature nor in our functional world’. To this end he uses a wide range of natural and industrially manufactured materials. His artistic endeavours pick up and develop ideas sparked by Land art and Arte Povera in the 1960s.

Cragg, who was born in England but has lived in Wuppertal, Germany, for over thirty years, designed four groups of works that are displayed inside and outside the Bundesbank’s Düsseldorf Regional Office. The complex ensemble consisting of a number of components alludes to the local region and the industrial tradition of the Ruhr Valley. "Unsere Brocken" [Boulders] is a group of four perforated granite boulders that vividly epitomises the interaction between humankind and the environment. Cragg sees it as symbolising the artificial transformation of natural material. The mechanical perforation of the solid rocks highlights both nature’s vulnerability and the human race’s ultimate responsibility for its actions, while simultaneously revealing the petrified power residing in the boulders.

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